Nature Speaks of Love and Sorrow: New Reviews, and a 30 Poems in 30 Days Update

I’ve recently been reflecting more about how much of an honor it is to know that my book is in some of your homes, and in your hands. The feeling is one of deep gratitude and appreciation. A deep appreciation and gratitude for each of you. Thank you for always being here, for your support, and for your friendship.

I’ve also been reflecting upon the new reviews of #1 Amazon New Release Nature Speaks of Love and Sorrow, which I’ve seen come up on Amazon and Goodreads. They are amazing. Here are the newest reviews.

Nature Speaks of Love and Sorrow: New Reviews

Paula Light, of Light Motifs II

5.0 out of 5 stars A magical journey…

Jeff’s poetry is like a walk with a friend at dawn. He weaves earthy images with heartfelt emotions to create a beautiful tapestry of wonder. From his first poem “Neutral Stances,” which admits to mysteries of the heart, we take a journey through love and loss–“Ocean and Sand”–breathing in the scents and sounds of the natural world, until we come to a place where we glimpse the radiance of hope. Jeff transforms a simple “Blueberry Tree” into memory’s healing power. From great tumult, “Blooming Tears,” comes great peace, “Mystical Rain.” Nestled within the sheltering trees and floral breezes, he transports us to a realm of magic–“The Sweetest Lullaby”– which is available to anyone who opens their eyes and heart to drink in nature’s lessons. “Moments Grasped” is the perfect finale. Illuminating!

Kathy L.

5.0 out of 5 stars Love and nature beautifully intertwined

Jeff Flesch’s poems use words to paint canvases in our minds. The theme of most of his poems deal with love and nature combined in a unique and engaging style that takes the reader on an enjoyable trek through the natural world around us, and the unseen one of our imaginations, where love resides in each leaf and blade of grass. Each poem is a testament to the eternality of nature, love, and not least of all, hope.

Sadje, of Keep it Alive

5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book, which connects love to nature

I loved this book by Jeff Flesch. The theme of the book is so relatable as he links our love for each other to our love for the universe and the nature around us. A must buy for the lovers of nature and poetry.

Melisa Quigley, of M.A. Quigley, Writer, and Poet

5.0 out of 5 stars Nature Heals

A sensory and at times metaphoric look at life through the Poet’s eyes of the past and present using nature as a healer. Voyage with Jeff through Blackberry Brambles, Cascading Water, Cosmic Arts (my three favorites), and more. You won’t be disappointed.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart, Paula, Kathy, Sadje, and Melisa. I am touched and deeply honored by your beautiful words.

I will publish another post later this week with a few more beautiful reviews. Such an honor.

Nature Speaks of Love and Sorrow: 30 Poems in 30 Days Collaboration

I am overjoyed with the response thus far to the Nature Speaks of Love and Sorrow: 30 Poems in 30 Days collaborative invitation. Every poem I received has touched my heart.

If you’d like to be a part of this collaboration, submissions are currently open and will remain open through September 23. You can read the submission details here.


One last thing before we go.

About two months ago I was reading Off Center & Not Even, by Timothy Price, and there was this stunning image, which led the photos that day, you can see it here. I commented that I would love to have that image hanging on a wall in my house. Well, Tim responded with, what size would you like. I told him the size, and here is what it looks like hanging on my wall. I love it. Thank you again, Tim.


#1-amazon-new-release, #poetry, #30-poems-in-30-days, #building-community, #collaboration, #invitation, #love, #nature, #nature-speaks-of-love-and-sorrow, #poems, #reviews, #sorrow

An Inquiry and Invitation Series 1: Imagination, Innovation, and Sociology?

Photo by Alejandro Benėt on Unsplash

Have you ever thought about how the imagination works? I’ve not considered it overmuch, yet have been considering it more recently.

With the current COVID-19 pandemic, the whole world is working to conceptualize new businesses, lifestyles, relationships, organizational structures, and staffing models.

There really is no safe haven from the need to innovate continuously right now. If you find yourself in a situation where creating new ways to conceptualize the aforementioned is unnecessary, I believe you are in the minority.

If you find yourself in the situation, like many, where the need to continuously innovate is your ever present reality. Breathe.

I’m thinking that a cursory look at imagination and innovation within a sociological context is an important inquiry. And, I think this inquiry is more important today than ever before. Why?

Because innovation is hard work. You can find yourself, as happens to me often, feeling frayed around the edges, and very tired. Yet, you must continue to persist.

Why? Because persistence inside of innovation is necessary and needed. The imagination, you ask? The imagination makes it all work.

Alright, so what does sociology have to do with the imagination?

As we’ve discussed in other posts, sociology is the study of group behavior. It is the study of how groups, and people within those groups, understand their place in a social and or cultural context. How they move, or are limited in movement, how they adapt, change, grow, work, and live.

Inquiring into imagination and innovation from a sociological perspective means taking a look at how innovation and imagination works in groups. Here are a couple of questions to get our inquiry started?

  • How do groups use their collective potential to utilize imagination in unique and innovative ways?
  • What are some strategies people can use to get the most out of their own imagination; and, harness the groups they belong to, to create innovative possibilities?
  • What does sociology have to do with imagination and innovation?

Okay, let’s start with these, and see what we get.

How do groups use their collective potential to utilize imagination in unique and innovative ways?

Though I can only speak to groups I’ve been a part of, I believe they probably function quite similarly, with some variance in the amount of creative output dependent on the members of the group.

For instance, in my current workgroup, we went from somewhat creative, to more creative in about 2 years, to very creative in year 3, and now, hyper-creative. Why the latter? Necessity.

As I’ve mentioned, the current state of reality right now demands it. You must stay on top of innovation, and your own personal and professional imagination is the gateway.

Here are some ways groups use their collective potential to imagine and innovate.

  • Share ideas with each other, all of them – often people are shy or fearful about sharing their creative potential, their own imagination to innovate. Don’t be. Share, and create, it is an awesome process.
  • Take people’s ideas further – when you are working with someone on a project, and they have an idea, take it further if you can. Step outside of timidness, and give all of your imaginative power to the project. You will get more innovation this way.
  • Step into ideas that live at the edge of what’s possible – live in a limitless space when you are imagining and innovating. Stay away from limits. Putting limits on your imagination, limits the project’s possibility.
  • Continue to reflect – even when you are not directly working on the project, continue to reflect upon the last conversation. You may get more imaginative insights, which will make your project more innovative.

What are some strategies people can use to get the most out of their own imagination; and, harness the groups they belong to, to create innovative possibilities?

There are many strategies you can use to kickstart your imagination. And, there are also various strategies to keep your imagination moving. Meaning, strategies to keep you open to more possibilities in the realm of the project you are working on. Let’s take a look at some of these.

  • Just get those ideas out – any way you can, get your ideas out of yourself, and into the world, somewhere, anywhere. Where and how matters less, than simply getting them out. An aside – once my oldest son came into my office, which was plastered with very large whiteboard post-its, and both white board walls were also full. He felt a little uneasy. He is now at a local company doing a computer science internship, and just recently shared with me that he understands the process of pouring forth your imagination in a whole new light. Get your ideas out.
  • Invite others to give you their insights – when you have your ideas out, have other people give you their insights. I find collaboration inside of imagination and innovation highly productive. You will find that they will take some of your ideas further, and then, guess what? You will take their additions to your ideas even further. A wonderful gift.
  • Let the ideas sit for a little while – one strategy I employ everyday inside of using my imagination to innovate is to let the newest ideas sit. Then I take time to reflect upon the ideas to see what other insights I get. Fun. I always get more insight after the initial creative output and collaboration.
  • Create a plan – as I’ve written about in many other posts, in order for your imaginative output to actually create innovative results, you must create a plan to bring the ideas into the world. Create a 30-day, 60-day, or 90-day plan, step 1, 2, 3, etc., to bring the project into the world.
  • Take action – once you have your plan in place, take at least one action a day. In order for a plan to actual bring forth your ideas, you will have to create time to actually work on the project. Too often projects fail, even with great ideas, because the actions to bring the project to life are not followed through on.

There are five very pragmatic strategies that, when used on a daily basis, will bring your imaginative potential to bear, and create more innovation within whatever context you are wanting to develop new possibilities.

What does sociology have to do with imagination and innovation?

How important is it to understand well those people you are in a relationship with? Yep, very. It is equally important to understand the groups you belong to just as well.

You must understand who in the group is the most imaginative and innovative. Why? Because you will know where to go for collaborative insight into the projects you are working on. Important.

And, to understand groups, it is important to understand how groups work, how they function within the greater context that the group belongs to.

Photo by Franck V. on Unsplash

For instance, if you are on a team within a larger organization, you need to know what are the limits on your creative possibilities. How is the group looked upon within the organization? Are they seen as an innovation center? Or, are they required to work within a more strict protocol?

After working on my current team, I can tell you that a mandate for any future endeavor will have to include the ability to imagine, innovate, and create. A must. A dealbreaker for me if it is missing.

However, if you are not thinking about these questions and concepts before taking on a new job, or project, and you are an imaginative and innovative person, you may get stuck in a situation that limits your potential. Not helpful, and can feel quite limiting and restricting.

I should add here that we are all imaginative and innovative. Sometimes that imagination and innovation gets covered up with concepts like adulthood and being grown up. Sad, and unnecessary.

The most productive and timeless contributions to history are made by those with no limits. Who take on their work and their projects with a sense of play.

Creating possibilities through their imagination and innovative ideas, while also bringing those around them into the conversation to take their playful ideas even further. Wonderful, exciting, and really being alive.

An Invitation

Alright, your turn. I know well that we all think differently, and use different strategies to imagine and innovate, so I would love to hear from you. And, here is a question you can play with, or feel free to create your own, which would be very much in line with this post.

What do you think about imagination and innovation, and their relation to sociology, and understanding well the groups we work with?

#creativity, #group-behavior, #imagination, #innovation, #innovative-possibilities, #innovative-strategies, #inquiry, #invitation, #play-at-work, #possibilities, #sociology, #work-as-play